Browse by
Summary Table
Presenting Author
All Authors
Author's Institutions
Abstract Title
Abstract Keywords
Program/Schedule
Programs At-A-Glance
Detailed Programs
Custom Schedule
Sessions
Date/Time
Locations
or
Search
Botany 2005 Home
Login

Abstract Detail


Paleobotanical Section

Little, Stefan A. [1], Smith, Selena Y. [1], Stockey, Ruth A. [1].

Autoflourescence in Eocene plants: confocal microscopy and its application to paleobotanical data.

Although confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) has been in common use for about 20 years, it has been largely limited in paleontological research to use on microfossils and mammal dentition. The autofluorescent nature of fossil and extant plant tissues is well known. However, CLSM provides the ability to detect autofluorescence emission patterns with great accuracy. In addition, the use of CLSM results in dramatically increased image resolution for autofluorescing remains, and also allows for the production of three dimensional reconstructions using computer software. This study presents some of the first uses of CLSM for research of vascular plant megafossils. In particular, structures containing complex secondary compounds are prime candidates for this technique, with the implication that these compounds have not undergone intense chemical degradation. The detailed information provided by this technique can potentially be used as a line of evidence for constructing whole plant concepts at a locality, as well as for correlating between localities. We demonstrate the utility of confocal techniques in examining permineralized fossil fruits, seeds, pollen, and vegetative organs from several localities in British Columbia, Canada.


Log in to add this item to your schedule

1 - University of Alberta, Department of Biological Sciences, Biological Sciences Centre, Cw 405, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2E9, Canada

Keywords:
confocal microscopy, fossil, Eocene.

Presentation Type: Poster
Session: 33-60
Location: Salon C, D & E - Gov Ballroom/Hilton
Date: Tuesday, August 16th, 2005
Time: 12:30 PM
Abstract ID:377


Copyright 2000-2005, Botanical Society of America. All rights