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Developmental and Structural Section

Smith, Bruce [1], Stum, Jaime [1].

Comparison among selected megagametophytic stages of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh Landsberg erecta and Columbia ecotypes.

Morphological variations of Landsberg erecta and Columbia ecotypes of A. thaliana have been noted. This effort was directed at measuring the length and width of selected stages of the megasporophytic and megagametophytic development of the Landsberg ecotype and to compare those with the same previously measured stages of the Columbia ecotype. Whole plants of Landsberg ecotype were grown, collected and fixed in FPA50 and cleared with the Herr Clearing Fluid. At least ten examples of each selected stage of the Landsberg ecotype were measured and the means, standard deviation and 95 % confidence intervals (CI) were compared before using the same statistical measurements to compare those same stages with the Columbia ecotype. To visualize variations in growth pattern between stages of the Landsberg ecotype and those same stages with the Columbia ecotype, lengths and widths were graphed using their mean values. The dyad stage length and width had the lowest mean values while the tetrad stage had the largest mean values for the Landsberg ecotype. In the Columbia ecotype the mean values increase slightly from the megaspore mother cell to the tetrad stage, drops slightly for the functional megaspore and continues to rise to the highest point for the 4-nucleate stage.


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1 - York College of PA, Biology, York, Pennsylvania, 17405, USA

Keywords:
Arabidopsis.

Presentation Type: Poster
Session: 33-6
Location: Salon C, D & E - Gov Ballroom/Hilton
Date: Tuesday, August 16th, 2005
Time: 12:30 PM
Abstract ID:34


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